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Backyard Bingo Board

Backyard Bird Bingo

Objective: Bird watching is a great way to practice noticing details about birds and to practice learning scientific classification! Print up the bingo board and see if you can spot these birds.

Difficulty Level: Easy (ages 2-14)

Materials: Backyard Bird Bingo Board

Download and Print PDF: Backyard Bird Bingo

Backyard Bingo Board

Print this backyard bingo board.

Procedure: Here are nine common Oregon bird species. How many can you find in your neighborhood? Why the funny names?

About: Scientists have created a system to classify and categorize all known life forms on Earth. All scientists’ use this classification system giving all known life forms a scientific name that corresponds with its genus and species. The noisy bright blue, grey, and white bird we call a Scrub Jay has the scientific name Aphelocoma californica. This lets scientists know that its genus is Aphelocoma and its species is californica.

This two-name system is also called a binomial naming system, and was developed in the early 18th century by a scientist called Carl Linnaeus. His system helped scientists to have a shared set of rules for classifying new life forms and sharing information about them. He used Latin as the language for his naming system, so that scientists could all use a shared language, even if they spoke different languages. Our modern classification system is based on Linnaeus’ system, and categorizes all life into three broad groups, called domains: Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. Within each of these domains there are kingdoms. For example, Eukarya includes the kingdoms Animalia, Fungi, Plantae, and more. Each kingdom contains a phylum, followed by class, order, family, genus, and species. Each level of classification is also called a taxon.

Bird watching is a great way to practice noticing details about birds and to practice learning scientific classification!

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